• es
  • ca
  • en
  • Growth Cycle

    THE VINE’S GROWTH CYCLE V – The Harvest

    In the vineyard, the antepenultimate event is the harvest in which the grapes are removed from the vine and transported to the winery to begin the wine making process. In Batea this is generally between September and October. The time of harvest depends on a variety of factors-most notably the subjective determination of ripeness. As the grape ripens on the vines, sugars and pH increase as acids (such as malic acid) decrease. Tannins and other phenolics also develop which can affect the flavors and aromas in the resulting wine. The threat of detrimental weather and vine diseases (such as grey rot) …

    Continue Reading

    THE VINE’S GROWTH CYCLE IV – VERAISON

    During the veraison stage the colors of the grape take form-red/black or yellow/green depending on the grape varieties. This color changing is due to the chlorophyll in the berry skin being replaced by anthocyanins (red wine grapes) and carotenoids (white wine grapes). In a process known as engustment, the berries start to soften as they build up sugars. Within six days of the start of veraison, the berries begin to grow dramatically as they accumulate glucose and fructose and acids begin to fall In Batea, this stage happen in august, and about 35-55 days later, the grape will be ready …

    Continue Reading

    THE VINE’S GROWTH CYCLE III – Flowering and Fruit Set

    Flowering Depending on temperatures, 40–80 days after bud break the process of flowering begins with small flower clusters appearing on the tips of the young shoots looking like buttons. Flowering occurs around may when average daily temperatures stay between 15–20 °C (59–68 °F). A few weeks after the initial clusters appear, the flowers start to grow in size with individual flowers becoming observable.  It is during this stage of flowering that the pollination and fertilization of the grapevine takes place with the resulting product being a grape berry, containing 1-4 seeds. Each flower has the potential to form a single grape berry. Frost …

    Continue Reading

    THE VINE’S GROWTH CYCLE I – WINTER PRUNING AND GRAPEVINE BLEEDING

    From about February, vines are again in sap, the vine draws water with enormous force from as far as 30m below. This water presses against the freshly cut surfaces which haven’t callused yet, and oozes from there. This “bleeding” may last up to 2 weeks, and occasionally it develops into small runlets along the stem. Whether the draconian expression “bleeding” is appropriate is anyone’s guess, but it is assumed that low concentrations of minerals and sugars – the vine’s frost protection – are also flushed out with the water, which in case of further severe frosts can significantly damage the …

    Continue Reading